Trees for the Future

This woman is watering seedlings in a tree nursery that’s part of one of our projects in Senegal. Training farmers to create nurseries and grow seedlings is a vital part of building a network of forest gardens. Our technicians travel between villages to work with farmers like the woman in the photo, often over roads that are almost impassible in the rainy seasons. But the results are worth it. Planting trees, changing lives: http://trees.org/

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Trees for the Future

Two men at work maintaining a tree nursery in Senegal. One need that forest gardens meet that’s often overlooked: forest products, like the tree branches used to fence this nursery off from livestock and other animals. Including fast-growing trees in forest gardens gives farmers a source of fuel wood, leaf litter (for mulch), branches and bark close at hand. This helps to keep pressure off of remaining stands of native forests in the area.http://trees.org/

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Trees for the Future

In Senegal, a mother stands with her children next to part of a local women’s group tree nursery. We work with many village-level organizations in our agroforestry projects, and the support that members provide each other can be key to success. Because of the local group’s work, these children face a brighter future, a better environment and more economic opportunity. Planting trees, changing lives:

http://www.treesforthefuture.org/

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Trees for the Future

Hard work pays off: the shoots in this tree nursery in Senegal are coming up fast, and soon they’ll be ready to transfer to the fields. Earlier today we showed you a bare plot of land that’ll soon become a forest garden; seedlings like these are the raw material that make that transformation happen. In the process, they’ll transform the lives of a whole village. Planting trees, changing lives: 

 http://www.treesforthefuture.org/

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Trees for the Future

In Senegal, Lamine Tounkara and his children fill tree sacks with soil before planting a tree seed in each one. Like parents everywhere, he wants a better life for his kids. Thanks to his work (and theirs), they’ll have one: a forest garden means better nutrition, better soil and a higher income. All while taking pressure off the remaining stands of native local forests. Planting trees, changing lives: http://www.treesforthefuture.org/

 

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Trees for the Future

In this photo taken just a few days ago in Senegal, Mahamadou Konde and his son Saibo Konde stand next his live fence, a row of plants that protect his crops from animals. An important part of our work: helping communities create sustainable ways to thrive. This way, when Saibo Konde grows up, won’t be forced by poverty to leave his village for one of Africa’s overcrowded — and often dangerous — cities. Planting trees, changing lives: 
http://www.treesforthefuture.org/
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